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How to make Hand Sanitizer at Home

How to make Hand Sanitizer at Home

Hand sanitizer is a liquid, gel, or foam generally used to decrease infectious agents on the hands. n most settings, handwashing with soap and water is generally preferred. Hand sanitizer is less effective at killing certain kinds of germs, such as norovirus and Clostridium difficult and unlike soap and water, it cannot remove harmful chemicals. eople may incorrectly wipe off hand sanitizer before it has dried, and some are less effective because their alcohol concentrations are too low.

Make Sanitizer at Home

In most healthcare settings alcohol-based hand sanitizers are preferable to hand washing with soap and water. Reasons include it being better tolerated and more effective.Hand washing with soap and water; however, should be carried out if contamination can be seen, or following the use of the toilet. The general use of non-alcohol-based hand sanitizers has no recommendations.

Alcohol-based versions typically contain some combination of isopropyl alcohol, ethanol (ethyl alcohol), or n-propanol, with versions containing 60% to 95% alcohol the most effective.Care should be taken as they are flammable. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer works against a wide variety of microorganisms but not spores.Compounds such as glycerol may be added to prevent drying of the skin.Some versions contain fragrances; however, these are discouraged due to the risk of allergic reactions. Non-alcohol based versions typically contain benzalkonium chloride or triclosan; but are less effective than alcohol-based ones.

How to make Hand Sanitizer at Home

Alcohol has been used as an antiseptic at least as early as 1363 with evidence to support its use becoming available in the late 1800s. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer has been commonly used in Europe since at least the 1980s. The alcohol-based version is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the safest and most effective medicines needed in a health system.The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$1.40–3.70 per liter bottle.

The Clean Hands campaign by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) instructs the public in hand washing. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer is recommended only if soap and water are not available.
  • When using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer:
  • Apply product to the palm of one hand.
  • Rub hands together.
  • Rub the product over all surfaces of hands and fingers until hands are dry.
  • Do not go near flame or gas burner or any burning object during applying hand sanitizer.
The current evidence for the effectiveness of school hand hygiene interventions is of poor quality.

Alcohol-based hand sanitizers may not be effective if the hands are greasy or visibly soiled. In hospitals, the hands of healthcare workers are often contaminated with pathogens, but rarely soiled or greasy. In community settings, on the other hand, grease and soiling is common from activities such as handling food, playing sports, gardening, and being active outdoors. Similarly, contaminants like heavy metals and pesticides (generally found outdoors cannot be removed by hand sanitizers. Hand sanitizers may also be swallowed by children, especially if brightly-coloured.

Some commercially-available hand sanitizers (and online recipes for homemade rubs) have alcohol concentrations that are too low.This makes them less effective at killing germs.Poorer people in developed countries and people in developing countries may find it harder to get a hand sanitizer with an effective alcohol concentration. raudulent labeling of alcohol concentrations has been a problem in Guyana.
When it comes to preventing the spread of infectious diseases like COVID-19, nothing beats good old-fashioned handwashing.

But if water and soap aren’t available, your next best option, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is to use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol.

Unless you have a stockpile of store-bought hand sanitizer, you’ll likely have a hard time finding any at a store or online right now. Due to the rapid spread of the new coronavirus, most retailers can’t keep up with the demand for hand sanitizer.

The good news? All it takes is three ingredients to make your own hand sanitizer at home. Read on to find out how.


A word of warningHand sanitizer recipes, including the one below, are intended for use by professionals with the necessary expertise and resources for safe creation and proper utilization.

Only use homemade hand sanitizers in extreme situations when handwashing isn’t available for the foreseeable future.

Don’t use homemade hand sanitizers on children’s skin as they may be more prone to use them improperly, leading to a greater risk of injury.

What ingredients do you need?Making your own hand sanitizer is easy to do and only requires a few ingredients:

isopropyl or rubbing alcohol (99 percent alcohol volume)
aloe vera gel
an essential oil, such as tea tree oil or lavender oil, or you can use lemon juice instead
The key to making an effective, germ-busting hand sanitizer is to stick to a 2:1 proportion of alcohol to aloe vera. This keeps the alcohol content around 60 percent. This is the minimum amount needed to kill most germs, according to the CDC.

How do you make your own hand sanitizer?Jagdish Khubchandani, PhD, associate professor of health science at Ball State University, shared this hand sanitizing formula.

His hand sanitizer formula combines:
2 parts isopropyl alcohol or ethanol (91–99 percent alcohol)
1 part aloe vera gel
a few drops of clove, eucalyptus, peppermint, or other essential oil
If you’re making hand sanitizer at home, Khubchandani says to adhere to these tips:

  • Make the hand sanitizer in a clean space. Wipe down countertops with a diluted bleach solution beforehand.
  • Wash your hands thoroughly before making the hand sanitizer.
  • To mix, use a clean spoon and whisk. Wash these items thoroughly before using them.
  • Make sure the alcohol used for the hand sanitizer is not diluted.
  • Mix all the ingredients thoroughly until they’re well blended.
  • Don’t touch the mixture with your hands until it’s ready for use.
  • For a larger batch of hand sanitizer, the World Health Organization (WHO) has a formula for a hand sanitizer that uses:
isopropyl alcohol or ethanol
hydrogen peroxide
glycerol
sterile distilled or boiled cold water

Is it safe?

DIY hand sanitizer recipes are all over the internet these days — but are they safe?

These recipes, including the ones above, are intended for use by professionals with both the expertise and resources to safely make homemade hand sanitizers.

Homemade hand sanitizer is only recommended in extreme situations when you’re unable to wash your hands for the foreseeable future.

Improper ingredients or proportions can lead to:
lack of efficacy, meaning that the sanitizer may not effectively eliminate risk of exposure to some or all microbes
skin irritation, injury, or burns
exposure to hazardous chemicals via inhalation
Homemade hand sanitizer is also not recommended for children. Children may be more prone to improper hand sanitizer usage, which could lead to greater risk of injury.

How to use hand sanitizerTwo things to be aware of when using hand sanitizer:

You need to rub it into your skin until your hands are dry.
If your hands are greasy or dirty, you should wash them first with soap and water.
With that in mind, here are some tips for using hand sanitizer effectively.

Spray or apply the sanitizer to the palm of one hand.

Thoroughly rub your hands together. Make sure you cover the entire surface of your hands and all your fingers.

Continue rubbing for 30 to 60 seconds or until your hands are dry. It can take at least 60 seconds, and sometimes longer, for hand sanitizer to kill most germs.

What germs can hand sanitizer kill?

According to the CDC, an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that meets the alcohol volume requirement can quickly reduce the number of microbes on your hands.

It can also help destroy a wide range of disease-causing agents or pathogens on your hands, including the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2.

However, even the best alcohol-based hand sanitizers have limitations and don’t eliminate all types of germs.

According to the CDC, hand sanitizers won’t get rid of potentially harmful chemicals. It’s also not effective at killing the following germs:

norovirus
Cryptosporidium, which causes cryptosporidiosis
Clostridium difficile, also known as C. diff
Also, a hand sanitizer may not work well if your hands are visibly dirty or greasy. This may happen after working with food, doing yard work, gardening, or playing a sport.

If your hands look dirty or slimy, opt for handwashing instead of a hand sanitizer.

Handwashing vs. hand sanitizer

Knowing when it’s best to wash your hands, and when hand sanitizers can be helpful, is key to protecting yourself from the new coronavirus as well as other illnesses, like the common cold and seasonal flu.

While both serve a purpose, washing your hands with soap and water should always be a priority, according to the CDC. Only use hand sanitizer if soap and water isn’t available in a given situation.

It’s also important to always wash your hands:

after going to the bathroom
after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
before eating
after touching surfaces that could be contaminated
The CDC lists specific instructions on the most effective way to wash your hands. They recommend the following steps:

Always use clean, running water. (It can be warm or cold.)
Wet your hands first, then turn the water off, and lather your hands with soap.
Rub your hands together with the soap for at least 20 seconds. Make sure to scrub the back of your hands, between your fingers and under your nails.
Turn the water on and rinse your hands. Use a clean towel or air dry.
The bottom line
Hand sanitizer is a handy on-the-go way to help prevent the spread of germs when soap and water isn’t available. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can help keep you safe and reduce the spread of the new coronavirus.

If you’re having a hard time finding hand sanitizer at your local stores and handwashing isn’t available, you can take steps to make your own. You only need a few ingredients, such as rubbing alcohol, aloe vera gel, and an essential oil or lemon juice.

Although hand sanitizers can be an effective way of getting rid of germs, health authorities still recommend handwashing whenever possible to keep your hands free of disease-causing viruses and other germs.

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